Review: The Go-Giver

In 2007, when there was still a year left for the arrival of one of the most devastating global economic crisis of the current century, a book called “The Go-Giver” was published and, even a decade later, it continues to influence all kinds of professionals. Its premise is simple yet controversial: moving from a focus on oneself to a focus on serving (bringing value to) others can make a person rich – both spiritually and materially – faster. This somewhat counterintuitive argument, especially in a corporate world full of “sharks”, started to captivate hundreds of thousands of readers, to the point that the book is considered the most important parable of the business sector of our time.

Joe’s life takes a turn for the better when he meets a very special mentor named Pindar, who teaches him the importance of 5 alternative laws to succeed in the business world.

The  main character of this fiction, which has been so influential in the real world, is a young man named Joe who lives immersed in the mentality of making a profit, no matter how. This type of greedy people are also known as “go-getters”.
Joe’s life takes a turn for the better when he meets a very special mentor named Pindar, who teaches him the importance of 5 alternative laws to succeed in the business world.
The law of value, which determines the value of a person based on the wonderful experience he provides to others. What he receives is simply a result of the value provided.

The law of compensation, which measures the number of people a person is serving, as well as how satisfied and happy do they feel.
According to the book, the law of influence is determined by how abundantly the interests of other people, employees or partners are placed above your own. The more frequently the caring, the more “influential” the subject is considered.
The law of authenticity is centered on a simple but powerful premise: the most valuable gift with which you can give to someone is your unconditional support.
To conclude, the law of receptivity argues that the more receptive one is -and the less judgmental is with people that think differently – the more effectively one can create value for a company.

In 2015, authors Bob Burg and John David Mann reviewed the text and wrote an expanded edition of the popular work. These teachings based on the “give and you shall receive” philosophy are still influencing professionals from all over the world who are interested in a way of doing business where there is room for generosity.

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